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C-5 lifts off after training with aeromedical reservists

A C-5 aircraft makes a banking turn of approximately 15 degrees as it lifts off from training with the 932nd Airlift Wing March 2, 2019 at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois.  The 932nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron took part in a C-5M Super Galaxy patient evacuation training with the 142nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, visiting from New Castle Air National Guard Base, Delaware, at Scott AFB, Illinois, March 2.

The training consisted of setting up litters on the back of seats and in the cargo hold. Only three AES’s have been certified in the C-5 patient evacuation training. C-5 training prepares units who are uncertified to do aeromedical evacuations and to be one step closer to completing the training. 

“Our prime aircrafts are C-130, KC-135 and C-17,” said Senior Master Sgt. Tonya Hupp, 932nd AES Operations Superintendent. “The C-5 is our opportune aircraft that we can move patients in the event that we are needed, if there were a mass casualty.”  (U.S. Air Force photo by Lt. Col. Stan Paregien)

A C-5 aircraft makes a banking turn of approximately 15 degrees as it lifts off from training with the 932nd Airlift Wing March 2, 2019 at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron took part in a C-5M Super Galaxy patient evacuation training with the 142nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, visiting from New Castle Air National Guard Base, Delaware, at Scott AFB, Illinois, March 2. The training consisted of setting up litters on the back of seats and in the cargo hold. Only three AES’s have been certified in the C-5 patient evacuation training. C-5 training prepares units who are uncertified to do aeromedical evacuations and to be one step closer to completing the training. “Our prime aircrafts are C-130, KC-135 and C-17,” said Senior Master Sgt. Tonya Hupp, 932nd AES Operations Superintendent. “The C-5 is our opportune aircraft that we can move patients in the event that we are needed, if there were a mass casualty.” (U.S. Air Force photo by Lt. Col. Stan Paregien)

A C-5 aircraft makes a banking turn of approximately 15 degrees as it lifts off from training with the 932nd Airlift Wing March 2, 2019 at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron took part in a C-5M Super Galaxy patient evacuation training with the 142nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, visiting from New Castle Air National Guard Base, Delaware, at Scott AFB, Illinois, March 2. The training consisted of setting up litters on the back of seats and in the cargo hold. Only three AES’s have been certified in the C-5 patient evacuation training. C-5 training prepares units who are uncertified to do aeromedical evacuations and to be one step closer to completing the training. “Our prime aircrafts are C-130, KC-135 and C-17,” said Senior Master Sgt. Tonya Hupp, 932nd AES Operations Superintendent. “The C-5 is our opportune aircraft that we can move patients in the event that we are needed, if there were a mass casualty.” (U.S. Air Force photo by Lt. Col. Stan Paregien)