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932nd Security Forces Conducts Baton Training

Airman Zach Gamblin, 932nd Security Forces Squadron patrolman, simulates striking an adversary during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. While in an altercation with an adversary communication is essential. Using verbal commands such as ”stop” or “get back” can help minimize the use of force during an altercation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Airman Zach Gamblin, 932nd Security Forces Squadron patrolman, simulates striking an adversary during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. While in an altercation with an adversary communication is essential. Using verbal commands such as ”stop” or “get back” can help minimize the use of force during an altercation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Tech. Sgt. Zeferino Aguirre, 932nd Security Forces Squadron unit training manager , simulates striking an adversary during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. He is responsible for creating and implementing a training plan such as use of force or baton training. Training involves classroom lecture and hands on skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Tech. Sgt. Zeferino Aguirre, 932nd Security Forces Squadron unit training manager , simulates striking an adversary during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. He is responsible for creating and implementing a training plan such as use of force or baton training. Training involves classroom lecture and hands on skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Staff Sgt. Frederick Viele, 932nd Security Forces Squadron, explains the “gauntlet” portion of baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. While in an altercation with an adversary communication is essential. Using verbal commands such as ”stop” or “get back” can help minimize the use of force during an altercation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Staff Sgt. Frederick Viele, 932nd Security Forces Squadron, explains the “gauntlet” portion of baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. While in an altercation with an adversary communication is essential. Using verbal commands such as ”stop” or “get back” can help minimize the use of force during an altercation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Staff Sgt. D’Angelo Davis, 932nd Security Forces Squadron fireteam member, simulates detaining Staff Sgt. Frederick Viele, 932nd SFS, during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd SFS constantly trains in order to maintain readiness for what ever situation arises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

Staff Sgt. D’Angelo Davis, 932nd Security Forces Squadron fireteam member, simulates detaining Staff Sgt. Frederick Viele, 932nd SFS, during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd SFS constantly trains in order to maintain readiness for what ever situation arises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

SrA Isaac Robinson, 932nd Security Forces Squadron patrolman, is detained during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd SFS constantly trains in order to maintain readiness for what ever situation arises.   (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

SrA Isaac Robinson, 932nd Security Forces Squadron patrolman, is detained during baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd SFS constantly trains in order to maintain readiness for what ever situation arises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Melissa Estevez)

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. -- Citizen Airmen from the 932nd Security Forces Squadron conduct baton training July 14, 2019, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The 932nd SFS constantly trains in order to maintain readiness for what ever situation arises. While in an altercation with an adversary, communication is essential. Using verbal commands such as ”stop” or “get back” can help minimize the use of force during an altercation. The 932nd SFS is part of the 932nd Mission Support Group.

As reservist security forces personnel might only work one weekend a month, but many of them are security or police officers in their civilian careers as well. Reservist are able to use skills they learn in the military in their civilian careers and vise versa. “[This training] really allows us to not get complacent, build that muscle memory with this skill set and apply it to when we deploy and augment the active duty,” said Tech. Sgt. Zeferino Aguirre, 932nd SFS unit training manager.